Nomad Safaris launch new safari lodge in the Ruaha National Park, Tanzania

 

Kigelia Ruaha | Southern Tanzania | Southern Tanzania

Arguably Tanzania’s best safari lodge company Nomad Tanzania, has just announced a new acquisition in the remote Ruaha National Park:

“It’s been a tough few months bottling up our excitement about our new camp, Kigelia Ruaha, while we prepared to welcome it to our little family. Nomad has proudly assumed full ownership of Kigelia from our good friends at AfrikaAfrika and we’ll be running it as is until the 6th January 2014 when we’ll be closing for the green season, ready to open it with a fresh new look in June 2014.”

Quick intro to Kigelia Ruaha:

• Located in the best wildlife area in Ruaha National Park.
• Rich diversity of big mammals including great herds of elephant, regular sightings of big cats, greater & lesser kudu, sable and roan, fab birdlife, beautiful scenery & towering baobabs.
• A simple, stylish tented camp with a small team of dedicated staff, well off the beaten track.
• 6 large airy tents with pale wood furniture, verandah, en-suite bathroom, flush toilet and outdoor safari bucket shower.
• Shared activities: game drives in comfy open vehicles, bush walks, picnics and sundowners.
• Scheduled flight connections with Selous, Katavi/Mahale, Arusha (& northern circuit) and Dar es Salaam.
• Combines particularly well with Selous.

Kigelia Ruaha | Southern Tanzania | Southern Tanzania.

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Photographer David C. Schultz Captures Stunning Images of Nature from Antarctica to the American West PHOTOS – weather.com

Photographer David C. Schultz Captures Stunning Images of Nature from Antarctica to the American West PHOTOS - weather.com

From the American West to the Antarctic Circle, photographer David C. Schultz has captured stunning images that tell the story of these pristine, wild landscapes.

Schultz is based in Park City, Utah, but his work takes him around the world. He explains how weather can make or break his photos:

“Quality of light is very closely related to weather, and usually the more dynamic and dramatic the weather, the more interesting the photo will hopefully be,” he tells weather.com. “Bright, sunny, cloudless days are so boring. Even having just a single tiny cloud in the sky can make a dramatic difference in the image. I’ve waited hours for one to work its way into a shot.”
Photographer David C. Schultz Captures Stunning Images of Nature from Antarctica to the American West PHOTOS – weather.com.

Want to hunt black rhino? Dallas club to sell hunting permit at charity auction, in aid of rhino conservation!

Dallas Safari Clubs black rhino fundraiser prize is to kill one | Money | Banking and Money Investment News | | Herald Sun

A HUNTING group has said it will auction off a permit to kill an endangered black rhinoceros to raise funds to the cause of saving the black rhinoceros.

The Dallas Safari Club’s executive director Ben Carter said the auction at its annual convention in January is strictly about the conservation of the black rhinoceros, the Dallas Observer reported.

There are less than 1800 remaining black rhinos in Namibia and the Dallas Safari Club has secured a special permit from the government of Namibia and approval from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, to hunt one down.
Dallas Safari Clubs black rhino fundraiser prize is to kill one | Money | Banking and Money Investment News | | Herald Sun.

The great migration: Incredible images as thousands of wildebeest travel across Africa

Amazing photographs that show the long and treacherous journey made each year by thousands of wildebeest.

The animals are captured in all their glory as they travel from the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania all the way to the Maasai Mara National reserve in Kenya – often risking life and limb to get there.

The mass migration takes place between July and October every year, reaching its peak in August.

The great migration: Incredible images as thousands of wildebeest travel across Africa | Nature | News | Daily Express.

Quake rumours over new beached sea serpent in US

Social media has lit up with earthquake rumours after a giant oarfish washed up on a California beach – the second such discovery in several days.

The 4.3m (14ft) dead snake-like fish was found in the city of Oceanside – five days after another and larger specimen (5.5m) had been found.

Reports on social media recall an ancient Japanese myth linking extremely rare oarfish sightings to tremors.

BBC News – Quake rumours over new beached sea serpent in US.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year: winning photo.

Image

Essence of elephants: Greg du Toit (South Africa)

Ever since he first picked up a camera, Greg has photographed African elephants. ‘For many years,’ he says, ‘I’ve wanted to create an image that captures their special energy and the state of consciousness that I sense when I’m with them. This image comes closest to doing that.’ The shot was taken at a waterhole in Botswana’s Northern Tuli Game Reserve, from a hide (a sunken freight container) that provided a ground-level view. Greg chose to use a slow shutter speed to create the atmosphere he was after and try ‘to depict these gentle giants in an almost ghostly way.’ He used a wide-angle lens tilted up to emphasise the size of whatever elephant entered the foreground, and chose a narrow aperture to create a large depth of field so that any elephants in the background would also be in focus. Greg had hoped the elephants would turn up before dawn, but they arrived after the sun was up. To emphasise the ‘mysterious nature’ of these ‘enigmatic subjects’, he attached a polarising filter and set his white balance to a cool temperature. The element of luck that added the final touch to his preparation was the baby elephant, which raced past the hide, so close that Greg could have touched her. The slow shutter speed conveyed the motion, and a short burst of flash at the end of the exposure froze a fleeting bit of detail.

Nikon D3s + 16-35mm f4 lens + polarising filter; 1/30 sec at f22; ISO 800; Nikon SB-900 flash + SC28 remote cord; mini-tripod; Nikon cable-release.

See the rest of the winning images.